Investigating a New Way of Delivering Energy to Tackle Fuel Poverty Using Case Studies in Wales and Scotland

Author: Jane Kelly
Organisation:
Bangor University
Date: 2016
Location: Wales

Community energy projects offer significant potential for individual households to access cheaper locally generated and renewable sources of power. There are ostensible benefits with regard to both fuel poverty and environmental sustainability. 

The motives for joining or avoiding such schemes, however, are not well understood. If these factors are better known, scheme designers and managers can seek to include measures to boost membership and address reasons for non-participation. 

Proiseact Spéird – The Spéird Project: Understanding Influences on Fuel Poverty in Rural and Island Scotland

Author: Dr Keith Baker
Organisation:
Glasgow Caledonian University
Energy Action Scotland
Date: 2016
Location: Scotland

Tackling fuel poverty is a national agenda for both the UK and the devolved Scottish governments. However, current policies are based on assumptions largely derived from urban settings. Furthermore, economies of scale have made energy efficiency schemes more attractive to deliver in large conurbations than in dispersed settlements, which characterise rural areas. Early research has indicated that this is disadvantaging households in rural Scotland, but more detailed data would clarify the position and enable more nuanced policy decisions.

Identifying the Fair Share: Metering and Billing for District Heating – Research into Social Landlords’ Experiences of District Heating

Author: Tessa Clark
Organisation:
Changeworks Resources for Life Ltd
Date: 2015
Location: Scotland

The introduction of the Heat Network (Metering and Billing) Regulations 2014 meant that owners of properties operating district heating schemes were subject to new obligations. It has been assumed that such schemes deliver benefits to residents through reduced energy consumption and lower bills, thus helping to alleviate fuel poverty, but the actual dynamics of tenants’ awareness, knowledge and engagement with the practical and financial aspects of these systems are not fully understood.

Fuel Poverty and the Re-emergence of Wood as a Sustainable Source of Energy in Fife, Scotland and Beyond

Author: Ivan Delev
Organisation:
University of St Andrews
Date: 2012
Location: Scotland

The growth of fuel poverty has in part been driven by rising energy bills. Alternative fuel sources may provide cheaper and more sustainable options, potentially alleviating fuel poverty. Rural households can face extra challenges in obtaining and paying for mainstream fuel types in comparison with their urban equivalents but may also have particular advantages when it comes to accessing alternative fuel sources.

Renewable Heritage – A Guide to Microgeneration in Traditional and Historic Homes

Author: Changeworks
Date: 2009
Location: Scotland

The installation of microgeneration systems in residential properties has the potential to make an important contribution to reducing fossil fuel consumption and ensuring a sustainable fuel supply. However, this option may be challenging where the property is subject to strict rules governing modifications to its fabric. Historic buildings are often protected by legal directives or planning conventions such as conservation areas.

Evaluating and Improving Energy Efficiency Grant Leaflet Information for the Elderly Fuel Poor

Author: Amanda Palmer
Organisation:
Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development
De Montfort University
Date: 2008
Location: Scotland

The success or failure of energy efficiency schemes directed at domestic consumers depends in large part on effective marketing. Previous evidence has indicated relatively low take-up of such schemes among older people, who form households with some of the highest levels of fuel poverty.

Energy Heritage – A Guide to Improving Energy Efficiency in Traditional and Historic Homes

Author: Nicholas Heath
Organisation:
Changeworks
Date: 2008
Location: Scotland

Achieving national targets for carbon emissions cannot be accomplished without addressing energy wastage in domestic properties. Many older houses are inefficient, and their occupants face an increased risk of fuel poverty. These houses are often ‘hard to treat’ and pose challenges when it comes to the installation of energy efficiency measures, both large and small.

Energy Ratings and Affordability in Social Housing in Scotland and Northern Ireland

Author: Bill Wilkinson
Organisation:
Energy Audit Company
Date: 2007
Location: Scotland

If national targets for reducing fuel poverty are to be met, ensuring a significant improvement in the energy efficiency of the UK’s social housing stock is vital. The introduction of the Decent Homes Standard and Scottish Housing Quality Standard offered a major opportunity to achieve this. Technically robust, standardised common measurement frameworks will enable housing associations to compare their performance. An earlier work (EAGA40) had developed a toolkit for England and Wales, but the different contexts of Scotland and Northern Ireland required a modified approach. 

The Effect of the Affordable Warmth Programme on Internal Environmental Variables and Respiratory Health in a Vulnerable Group: A Randomised Trial

Author: Dr Liesl Osman
Organisation:
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen City Council
Aberdeen Royal Infirmary
Castlehill Housing Association
Date: 2007
Location: Scotland

Living in a poorly heated, damp home is known to place householders at risk of developing ill health. Those with pre-existing conditions, particularly respiratory illnesses, can experience aggravations of their symptoms and an increased likelihood of mortality. However, there is a paucity of information on the energy performance of the homes of such people and the exact relationship between their heating arrangements, health status and other variables. 

Tackling the Health Implications of Cold and Damp Housing in Scotland

Author: Trevor Davison (employment and training consultant)
Organisation:
Co-funded by NHS Education for Scotland and NHS Health Scotland
Date: 2004
Location: Scotland

In 2003, Davison had produced ‘Tackling the Health Implications of Cold and Damp Housing in Scotland – A Training Resource’, which was funded by Eaga Charitable Trust and supported by NHS Education for Scotland and NHS Health Scotland. This educational resource was aimed at raising awareness among frontline health workers in Scotland of the impact of cold and damp housing and enabling them to offer advice and guidance to clients

Health Implications of Cold and Damp Housing – A Training Resource (Updated)

Author: Trevor Davison (employment and training consultant)
Date: 2003
Location: Scotland

The link between living in cold and damp properties and adverse health is accepted by practitioners and researchers in housing, energy and health. However, interventions to address poor housing are usually undertaken by workers in the housing, environmental or energy sectors who may have had no prior relationships with the household.  

Fuel Poverty and Health in Paisley

Author: Chris Revie
Organisation:
Energy Action Scotland
Date: 1999
Location: Scotland

Large-scale literature reviews (Ambrose et al., 1996) and specific studies appear to have confirmed that poor housing and poor health have a close relationship and that improving housing conditions has a positive effect (Green, 1997; Collins, 1999; Wilkinson, 1999). However, establishing a causal link remains challenging, in part because of the large number of variables to account for. It may also be the case that the health-led nature of previous research has not fully appreciated the complexities of some of the housing inputs.

 

The Impact of Fuel Poverty and Housing Conditions on Scotland's Health – A Review of Available Literature

Author: Chris Revie
Organisation:
Energy Action Scotland
Date: 1998
Location: Scotland

Scotland has particular challenges when it comes to tackling fuel poverty, housing and health. Although considerable amounts of research have been conducted in Scotland and the UK as a whole, a general summary has not been produced. Such an overview would enable an awareness of the current state of knowledge and allow future work to be targeted more effectively.

Billsavers – Securing the Savings

Author: Lothian and Edinburgh Environmental Partnership
Date: 1996
Location: Scotland

Many low-income households are also in fuel poverty and fuel debt. They can often face the conundrum of needing to reduce the amount they spend on domestic energy while at the same time being unable to afford the cost of installations that would potentially achieve the necessary savings. However, if funding to carry out such work can be justified, this challenge may be overcome.

Lilybank – Tackling Fuel Poverty

Author: Ludmilla Kosmina
Organisation:
Heatwise Services
Alembic Research
Date: 1995
Location: Scotland

Large-scale retrofit programmes have occurred in social housing stock across the UK. Comprehensive modelling of the potential benefits to residents before work commences is important for our understanding of what are the optimal interventions under different conditions (such as building type and history, geographical location and residents’ socioeconomic status).

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