Gender-based Perspectives of Fuel Poverty in Scotland

Author: Helen Melone
Date: 2019
Location: UK

Studies in the developing world and mainland Europe (e.g. Eige, 2016; Clancy et al 2017) have shown that gender has an impact on energy awareness, needs and behaviours. The evidence is less comprehensive in the UK, where studies on gender and poverty in general are much more common. However, there is strong circumstantial evidence that women are at higher risk of experiencing circumstances known to make households more vulnerable to fuel poverty, such as lower incomes, heading single parent families, and having carer status.

The Health of the Nation: Analysis of Cost-effectiveness and Success Factors in Health-related Fuel Poverty Schemes

Author: Sarah Fletcher
Organisation:
Lewisham Council
SE2 Ltd
Date: 2017
Location: UK

There is substantial evidence that demonstrates a connection between fuel poverty and poor health outcomes, but, despite the existence of numerous programmes designed to alleviate fuel poverty, its levels have not declined significantly. It is known that initiatives have often missed the most vulnerable households, in part because of inadequate data, but also because fuel poverty has multifactorial causes. Much activity is supported by locally based organisations and networks, but over the last decade the government has drastically reduced central funding, thus undermining their ability to

Smart Prepayment and Fuel Poverty

Author: Nicky Hodges
Organisation:
Centre for Sustainable Energy (CSE)
Date: 2016
Location: UK

Prepayment meters (PPMs) have traditionally been installed in low-income households and those that have previously incurred arrears or defaulted on their energy bills. However, PPM users have often faced higher charges for energy, as well as a reduced ability to switch supplier and access incentivised payment methods such as direct debit. In 2016, the Competitions and Markets Authority imposed a settlement on energy companies to introduce a fairer approach.  

Policy Heterogeneity in Fuel Poverty Alleviation: A Comparative Analysis of Germany and the United Kingdom

Author: Andreas Schneller
Organisation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Date: 2015
Location: UK

Fuel poverty is recognised by researchers as a major challenge for European citizens and their governments. However, individual countries have given the topic different levels of recognition, priority and resources on both an academic and a policy level. Comparisons between countries have been rare in the literature to date and may offer a valuable perspective.

Using Solar PV to Tackle Fuel Poverty

Author: Changeworks
Date: 2014
Location: UK

The use of photovoltaic (PV) systems in domestic properties boomed after the introduction of the Feed-in Tariff (FIT) in 2010. The deployment of solar technologies should see a decline in energy users’ fuel costs (and thus fuel poverty), while property owners (including landlords) should benefit from the income generated by the FIT. The wider context of rising fuel poverty acts as a spur to implement the energy efficiency measures with the greatest impact on consumption.

The Energy Penalty: Disabled People and Fuel Poverty

Author: Mike George
Organisation:
Centre for Consumers and Essential Services
University of Leicester
Date: 2013
Location: UK

Householders with disabilities or long-term limiting illnesses are known to be disproportionately at risk of being out of work, reliant on benefits and on low incomes. In addition, many disabled people use greater than average amounts of domestic energy, which is due to factors such as lower levels of activity and spending more time at home. An environment of rising energy prices and restrictions on benefits is likely to affect such consumers much harder and make domestic energy less affordable.

Effect of Improved Home Ventilation on Asthma Control and House Dust Mite Allergen Levels

Author: Dr Stirling Howieson
Organisation:
University of Strathclyde
Date: 2013
Location: UK

The number of better insulated, warmer and more humid homes has increased substantially over the past few decades in developed nations. At the same time, growing levels of asthma have been identified among their populations. It is known that allergens produced by domestic dust mites are a contributory factor to asthma and that these mites thrive in warm and humid environments. As a consequence, solutions to minimise mite levels while retaining warmth would have valuable health benefits.

Housing Energy and Fuel Poverty Assessment Tool (HEAT)

Author: Centre for Sustainable Energy
Organisation:
EAGA Charitable Trust and the Government Office for the South West
Date: 2012
Location: UK

Obtaining appropriate data remains one of the core challenges in addressing fuel poverty. The development of national targets for eradicating fuel poverty and reducing carbon emissions, along with centrally funded and directed programmes targeting fuel poor households and tackling substandard properties, has generated a demand for a robust but user-friendly evidence base from which those responsible for the delivery of schemes can develop their plans. In addition, in order for national government, the energy sector and researchers to review progress, a common system of measurement is needed

Costs of the ECO: the impact on fuel poverty

Date: 2011
Location: UK

Historically, government initiatives to support the UK to move towards a low carbon environment have been resourced through levies on energy companies, which, in turn, have passed on the cost to consumers in the form of higher bills (referred to as ‘cost pass-through’). The introduction of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), planned for 2013, is intended to provide the finance for the Green Deal and other core fuel poverty programmes. Like earlier schemes, the costs may be transferred to energy consumers, but the nature of such impact is unknown.

Costs of the ECO: The Impact on Low Income Households

Author: Association for the Conservation of Energy (ACE)
Date: 2011
Location: UK

Historically, government initiatives to support the UK to move towards low-carbon energy have been resourced through levies on energy companies, which, in turn, have passed on the cost to consumers in the form of higher bills (referred to as ‘cost pass-through’). The introduction of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), which is planned for 2013, is intended to provide the finance for the Green Deal and other core fuel poverty programmes. As with earlier schemes, the costs may be transferred to energy consumers, but the impacts of this are under-researched.

Too Many Hurdles: Information and Advice Barriers in the Energy Market

Author: Mike George
Organisation:
Centre for Consumers and Essential Services
University of Leicester
Date: 2011
Location: UK

The domestic energy market is heterogeneous and complex in terms of both suppliers and consumers. This means that ensuring the appropriate advice and guidance reach the relevant consumers is a challenge, but the dynamics are not understood in detail. This is essential if better policies and practice are to be developed, particularly for the proportion of consumers who are deemed to be vulnerable. It is also highly relevant for a number of reasons.

Tackling Fuel Poverty in the Private Rented Sector Using the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS)

Author: Impetus Consulting and National Energy Action
Date: 2011
Location: UK

Local authorities possess significant powers of inspection and enforcement over rented accommodation within their boundaries, which have been enhanced by legislation over the past 20 years (e.g. the Housing Act 2004). At the same time, tackling fuel poverty has become an important agenda for councils.

Using solar PV to tackle fuel poverty

Author: Changeworks
Organisation:
Changeworks
Date: 2010
Location: UK

The use of photovoltaic (PV) systems in domestic properties boomed after the introduction of the Feed In Tariff (FIT) in 2010. The deployment of solar technologies should see energy users’ fuel costs (and thus fuel poverty) declining, while property owners (including landlords) should benefit from the income generated by the FIT. The wider context of rising fuel poverty acts as a spur to implement select those energy efficiency measures with the greatest impact on consumption.

Distributional Impacts of UK Climate Change Policies

Author: Ian Preston
Organisation:
Centre for Sustainable Energy (CSE)
Association for the Conservation of Energy (ACE)
Date: 2010
Location: UK

In 2009, the UK government introduced the Low Carbon Transition Plan (LCTP), which mapped out how the nation would move towards a renewable-energy-based and low-carbon system. While this programme offered the prospect of a significant improvement to the nation’s housing stock, it was unclear what obligations the domestic sector would have in meeting the financial liabilities for implementing this strategic vision. A proper assessment of the resources needed to fulfil the policies, alongside an evaluation of how the costs could be distributed, was essential.

How Much? The Cost of Alleviating Fuel Poverty

Author: Ian Preston
Organisation:
Centre for Sustainable Energy
Association for the Conservation of Energy (ACE).
Date: 2008
Location: UK

Tackling fuel poverty requires significant capital investment, but it is also important to ensure that measures are directed at those who most need them in order to optimise the outcomes with regard to policy objectives. Understanding whether current delivery mechanisms are adequately funded and are effectively targeting fuel poor households is essential, not least because legal commitments exist to eliminate fuel poverty.

Seasonal Cold, Thermal Behaviour and Temperature Distributions in the Homes of Older People

Author: Dr James Goodwin
Organisation:
School of Health and Social Care
University of Teesside
Date: 2005
Location: UK

There is a significant gap in knowledge of the winter activities of older people, both inside and outside the home. This is despite the fact that previous research has recognised that many older people continue to live in fuel poverty and that excess winter deaths disproportionately affect this section of the population. Understanding the types and levels of activity and their relationships to warmth, heating systems and temperature (both inside and outside) has considerable importance not only for energy research and the energy sector, but also for health and social care.

Addressing Fuel Poverty through Community Planning – A Toolkit: Developing Effective Community Participation and Partnerships

Author: Impetus Consulting
Date: 2004
Location: UK

Energy efficiency schemes that are directed at domestic properties use a variety of techniques to communicate with and involve local communities. These can range from the very basic (e.g. leaflets through the door) to much more complex models underpinned by concepts of behaviour change. Across many areas of the public, private and third sectors, community participation in some or all aspects of a programme, from design to delivery, is now regarded as good practice and essential to securing long-term commitment to its objectives.

Affordable Warmth in ‘Hard to Heat’ Homes: A Progress Report

Author: Jacky Pett
Organisation:
Association for the Conservation of Energy (ACE)
Date: 2004
Location: UK

A significant number of domestic properties in the UK are classed as ‘hard to heat’. These are often older, solid wall houses, which present particular challenges for retrofit and other energy conservation measures. Earlier studies have outlined the nature of the problem and proposed ways forward. The introduction of the UK Fuel Poverty Strategy in 2001 and improved awareness of the issues surrounding hard-to-heat housing have generated an increased focus on this challenge.

Green Futures Supplement – Warm Justice

Author: Various
Organisation:
Green Futures
Date: 2002
Location: UK

Green Futures is a bimonthly magazine with news and debate on how the UK can make the transition to sustainability. This grant is for the production of a special supplement to Green Futures on fuel poverty, energy efficiency and health. Drawing on the experience of leading thinkers and practitioners in the field, this supplement will help make the case for a more positive, creative approach to achieving a sustainable energy future in the UK and bringing people out of energy-related poverty. 

Rural Fuel Poverty – Defining a Research Agenda

Author: William Baker
Organisation:
Centre for Sustainable Energy (CSE)
Date: 2002
Location: UK

In 2001, Eaga Charitable Trust (CT) and the CSE held a national conference on rural fuel poverty. Following on from this, EAGA CT commissioned the CSE to undertake a review of the subject.

Gas and Electricity Competition… Who Benefits?

Author: William Baker
Organisation:
Centre for Sustainable Energy (CSE)
Co-funded by Transco
Centrica
Scottish Power
Ofgem and the Electricity Association
Date: 1999
Location: UK

Full liberalisation of the UK gas markets occurred in 1998, preceded by a pilot phase operating in South West England from 1996. Research into the impact of competition on low-income households during the pilot stage demonstrated that certain groups – households using prepayment meters and those without bank accounts or wanting to pay in cash, plus consumers with special needs – were losing out. In 1999, the electricity markets were fully opened to competition.

Methods of Paying for Fuel – A Good Practice Guide

Author: National Energy Action (NEA)
Date: 1998
Location: UK

Low-income households are often placed at a disadvantage when paying for the energy they consume. Owing to limited or unstable income and debt, many cannot access the full range of payment methods suppliers offer to customers. Furthermore, they are often restricted to options such as prepayment meters, which charge more for fuel, compounding the effect of reduced choice.  

Energy Efficiency Advice: Provision by Fuel Suppliers

Author: National Energy Action (NEA)
Date: 1997
Location: UK

Firms supplying gas and electricity to UK households are obliged by law to provide customers with energy efficiency advice and have clear codes of practice outlining their offer. As a consequence, suppliers are among the main providers of energy advice, and, since the liberalisation of the energy markets in the 1990s, the number of suppliers has increased, expanding the range of advice materials. Previous research revealed widespread inadequacies in the quality of advice services and limited value for customers.

Making Cold Homes Warmer – The Effect of Energy Efficiency Improvements in Low-income Homes

Author: Geoffrey Milne
Organisation:
Environmental Change Unit
University of Oxford
Date: 1997
Location: UK

Domestic energy efficiency improvements are undertaken with the intention of reducing energy demand and consumption, since less fuel is needed to heat the house to a comfortable level. In doing so, it is assumed that this will reduce the amount households spend on fuel and deliver more affordable warmth. However, some of the ‘gains’ may be offset by a general increase in internal temperatures following improvements as householders use the monetary savings to fund warmer homes, a phenomenon known as ‘temperature takeback’.

Energy Efficiency Information Pack

Author: Neighbourhood Energy Action
Location: UK

Sheltered housing, nursing homes and other managed residential schemes raise complex challenges for energy efficiency measures. In the first instance, the buildings (or series of buildings) often occupy a significant space. Secondly, the residents may have health or mobility problems that lead them to be inside more than the average person, be less active and require more heat. Lastly, there may be many individual actors – staff, residents and visitors – with different priorities and levels of motivation and with roles that generate very varied patterns of energy use.

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